[FoRK] Disruptive innovation

Stephen Williams sdw at lig.net
Fri Dec 30 15:29:22 PST 2011


http://hbr.org/web/slideshows/how-retailers-are-reinventing-shopping/1-slide

On 12/29/11 10:35 AM, Stephen Williams wrote:
> On Thu Dec 29 08:21:46 2011, Jeff Bone wrote:
>>
>>
>> Okay, so my spidey-sense is tingling again, it's like a case of hives, figured I'd come out of seclusion long enough to get 
>> this prognostication on record.
>>
>> As with Napster early on, I think there's something very significant going on that most folks haven't caught onto yet, but 
>> that has the potential to disrupt just about everything.
>>
>> Years ago I said "put cameras in cell phones and Big Shit happens." Or something like that.
>>
>> It's happening. The other, synergistic / enabling key technologies are ubiquitous connectivity, access to large-scale compute 
>> cycles ("the cloud") and significant advances in computer vision in conjunction with big data.
>
> Welcome Mr. Bone. We've been expecting you.
>
> We've been dabbling in machine vision, AR, mobile, social, etc. And we're not alone:
>
> http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2076742/Google-unveil-hi-tech-Google-glasses-superimpose-information-world.html
>
> There are all kinds of exciting breakthroughs lately, including formerly toy technology that is suddenly good enough to wow 
> the average consumer. (Siri et al, Kinnect, etc.)
>
> We're getting revolutions in apps, interfaces, services, commerce, communication, device features and availability, etc. We've 
> broken the expensive consumer devices logjam.
>
> This should be fun.
>
>> Amazon Flow, Walgreen's iPhone "scan to refill" app, and similar product-recognizing cloud services --- where "the cloud" has 
>> millions of eyes all over the place and can recognize and recall millions of products, and eventually people, locations, 
>> situations, etc. --- are game-changers.
>>
>> Brick-and-mortar is in trouble. Showroom model, anyone? The potential impact of this kind of point-and-shoot exo-brain tied 
>> into the consumer ecosystem is HUGE. As in, tough for even me to get my head around.
>
> Non-specialty showrooms are only going to continue to exist where they can find an angle that gives them some offline 
> revenue.  Or they find a way to get some online revenue.
> There are a lot of possibilities.  Among them, 0-day shipping: Find and buy on Amazon, pick up at the store or have it 
> couriered on the 4 o'clock product shuttle.  Service, education, and returns are another possibility.  And used reselling, 
> probably through Amazon et al so people know they're getting a fair deal.  pawn.amazon.com.
>
> We're going to have an evolution of affiliated and unaffiliated brick-and-mortars.  Best Buy level dualism is one avenue, but 
> that's tough to pull off if you're not at scale.
>
>>
>> My $0.02. Amazon Flow. Jeff Bob sez check it out.
>>
>>
>> jb
>>
>
> sdw
>
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