[FoRK] Chons

Eugen Leitl eugen at leitl.org
Sun Feb 6 01:32:38 PST 2011


----- Forwarded message from coderman <coderman at gmail.com> -----

From: coderman <coderman at gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2011 02:46:01 -0800
To: Eugen Leitl <eugen at leitl.org>
Cc: cypherpunks at al-qaeda.net
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Chons

On Sat, Feb 5, 2011 at 12:47 AM, Eugen Leitl <eugen at leitl.org> wrote:
> ...
>>> Re Mesh - I have been mucking with it for many years and reading about
>>> it even longer. Seems solutions for getting what appears a group that
>> Fun fact: a local /64 is fully enough to encode lat/long/alt
>> (24, 24, 16 bit) with about 2 m resolution....

ORCHID address space is perfect for this type of thing, and there are
particular extensions well suited to this. [0][1]


> There are a couple main types of use cases for this kind of capability:
> A) emergency situations of various types like the Egypt blackout and
>...
> There has been plenty of work with open source cell networks, etc.  I
> haven't seen anything usable about hand-held mesh and/or store and forward
> capability yet.

this came up on the p2p-hackers list, which i can't seem to get mail
through, [3]

regarding Android in particular, sounds similar to Serval. [2]

best regards,


0. An IPv6 Prefix for Overlay Routable Cryptographic Hash Identifiers
(ORCHID)
  http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4843
[*this: just substitute the cryptographic with hashed coordinates or
searchable prefixes, or both given privacy considerations.]


1.
  http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-montenegro-6lowpan-dymo-low-routing-03
[*this: combine with geo-aware addressing.]


2. Serval Project
  http://www.servalproject.org/how-it-works


3. [p2p-hackers] What we should build for the Egyptian (and other) protesters
  http://lists.zooko.com/pipermail/p2p-hackers/2011-February/002829.html
"""
On Fri, Feb 4, 2011 at 10:54 AM, Alen Peacock <alenlpeacock at gmail.com> wrote:
> I'd always hoped that a global ad-hoc wireless network would spring
> from something like MIT's RoofNet
> (http://pdos.csail.mit.edu/roofnet/doku.php).
>
> There's still a lot of academic research into ad-hoc networks, but I'm
> not aware of anyone really pursuing something like this in the
> commercial space

not to any noteworthy degree. the attempts have been numerous in both
commercial and research focus.

given the number of ad-hoc routing protocols, developers capable of
understanding the merits and detriments of general approaches and
specific implementations, and certainly not least of all the
difficulty in early-adoption of such a Metcalfe utility dependent
"collaborative transport" is quite difficult.

see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ad_hoc_routing_protocols



as for my druthers i am keenly interested in combined topologies and
overlays leveraging the distinct advantages of particular transports
together for a best effort, immediately accessible ad-hoc
infrastructure. leased circuits and dedicated fiber continued to work
in Egypt; a BGP4 peering blackout is just a small slice of the overall
communication stacks and paths.
(you can run E-Line/E-LAN over free space optics as easily as MPLS /
WDM lambdas over fiber, multi-OFDMA wide band systems can be
aggregated over polarizations and center bands, etc, etc. the
possibilities are endless. and even packet over shortwave can carry
signalling channels around the globe...)

===

On Fri, Feb 4, 2011 at 2:17 PM, David Barrett <dbarrett at quinthar.com> wrote:
> ...
> On this topic, it'd be great if you could simultaneously be connected to
> two networks (eg, a wireless DSL router *and* broadcast a mesh
> repeater).  I don't think you can do this in the strict sense,

use madwifi-ng and a mobile IPv4/IPv6 transport. for example a custom
SOCKS/HTTP/Transparent proxy to multi-homed SCTP over VPNs on virtual
station madwifi-ng capable hardware. (i've used up to 6 clients per
radio with success, and maximum 8 radios per PCI host bus.)

lots of options in this space as well. just not cheap or easy yet...
"""

----- End forwarded message -----
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Eugen* Leitl <a href="http://leitl.org">leitl</a> http://leitl.org
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