[FoRK] Shameless solicitation for talent

Tony Berkman tony
Wed Oct 5 13:06:15 PDT 2005


Hello all,

I am a long-time lurker, some-time poster and I've been having such a
difficult time finding the right candidate for a current job opening
that I thought I would give FORK a try and maybe someone will find their
perfect job :)

We are kind of a next-generation equity research firm.  We don't issue
buy and sell recommendations, and all of our research is driven by
proprietary data from both external and internal sources.

A lot of what we do involves a large initiative to scrape millions of
Web pages regularly so we can track inventories, pricing, etc. on a
real-time basis and do things like reverse-engineer revenue yield for an
airline or cruise company for example.  Our clients for this type of
thing are hedge funds and mutual funds.

Anyway, what were looking for is a crack programmer with a passion for
the stock market and learning about new businesses, who can learn new
companies/industries quickly and work within the research team to try to
figure out a way to use our data and/or figure out what data is out
there that will enable us to provide transparency into a company/sector.
For instance how might one measure the number of cars going into mall
parking lots every day?  Or how many RVs is Winnebego shipping to
retailers every quarter, etc.

We are a well financed start-up (actually just under 3 years old now)
generating cash and having a lot of fun doing some that we think is
pretty revolutionary in this business (good research, imagine that).
There is a lot more information about us on our Website and here and
there in the press.  Anyway, please contact me if you have any interest.


Thanks!!!


Best regards,

 

Tony Berkman

Director of Research

Majestic Research  

4 Columbus Circle

NY, NY 10019

tel 646 442 6961

fax 212 504 7960

aim berkmant

 

| www.majesticresearch.com |


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Today's Topics:

   1. Re: 11 steps to democracy (mattj at newsblip.com)
   2. Re: 11 steps to democracy (J. Andrew Rogers)
   3. Technology/Innovation in AU (Mark Nottingham)
   4. Re: Hospitals and births  (was Re: (no subject)) (Mark Nottingham)
   5. Re: Technology/Innovation in AU  (Justin Mason)
   6. Re: 11 steps to democracy (mattj at newsblip.com)
   7. Ning, a social app construction set (Jim Whitehead)
   8. RE: Re: (no subject) (Russell Turpin)
   9. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (Lucas Gonze)
  10. Re: Re: (no subject) (Eugen Leitl)
  11. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (B.K. DeLong)
  12. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (Strata R. Chalup)
  13. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (Andy Armstrong)
  14. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (Andy Armstrong)
  15. Re: Hospitals and births  (was Re: (no subject)) (Corinna)
  16. Re: Re: (no subject) (Adam L Beberg)
  17. Re: Re: (no subject) (Dr. Robert Harley)
  18. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (mattj at newsblip.com)
  19. Re: Technology/Innovation in AU (Damien Morton)
  20. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (Lucas Gonze)
  21. Re: Ning, a social app construction set (Luis Villa)
  22. Re: Technology/Innovation in AU (Gavin Thomas Nicol)
  23. Re: Technology/Innovation in AU (James Tauber)
  24. DBs and online forms (Culture Lab)
  25. Re: DBs and online forms (Bill Humphries)
  26. Re: Technology/Innovation in AU (Mark Nottingham)
  27. Palm or iPOD? (Marty Halvorson)
  28. Vancouver's Still On Top... (The Economist)
      (Ian Andrew Bell (FoRK))
  29. Re: Palm or iPOD? (Ian Andrew Bell (FoRK))
  30. Re: DBs and online forms (Ken Meltsner)
  31. Re: DBs and online forms (Aaron Burt)
  32. National DNA database? Re: [FoRK] Re: (no subject) (Gordon Mohr)
  33. Re: Palm or iPOD? (Strata R. Chalup)
  34. Re: Three most import attributes for a Bush appointment
      (Adam L Beberg)
  35. [tlauriau at magma.ca: [Geowanking] 'Folksonomy' Carries
      Classifieds Beyond SWF and 'For Sale'] (Eugen Leitl)
  36. bioinformatics (Corinna)
  37. Re: DBs and online forms (Corinna)
  38. Re: Technology/Innovation in AU (James Tauber)
  39. Re: DBs and online forms (Gavin Thomas Nicol)
  40. Engineer/Architect wanted to design and spec a national
      wireless network (rudy rouhana)
  41. Re: Palm or iPOD? (Jim Whitehead)
  42. Re: Vancouver's Still On Top... (The Economist)
      (mattj at newsblip.com)
  43. NANO: Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines Now Freely
      Available Online (Eugen Leitl)
  44. Re: Three most import attributes for a Bush appointment (Naren)
  45. FEMA--dire opinion from the strangest magazine=govtech
      (Tracie K Meyer)
  46. Re: Re: DBs and online forms (Naren)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:00:10 -0600
From: mattj at newsblip.com
Subject: Re: [FoRK] 11 steps to democracy
To: "J. Andrew Rogers" <andrew at ceruleansystems.com>
Cc: FoRK <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <20051004130010.a36259f8o2sgg8gs at 216.194.106.19>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=ISO-8859-1;	format="flowed"

Quoting "J. Andrew Rogers" <andrew at ceruleansystems.com>:

>> 11. Adopt the Parliamentary Democracy practise of question time, in
>> which the President must publicly respond to questions from members
of
>> congress.
>
> Pointless.  Most of the blowhards in Congress already grandstand with
> non-questions far too much as it is.  That should be discouraged, not
> encouraged.

The President would have to respond to questions *and raspberries*.
Blair
doesn't just get to blow hot air for five minutes, without interruption,
never
answering the question.  In other words, it's the complete opposite of a
Bush
"press conference".  Under this proposal Bush would face questions
directly
from *Democrats*, and if he evaded he would be booed.  If you haven't
watched
"Question Time" (on C-SPAN), you must.

This (#11) is the one suggestion I am in complete agreement with.

-Matt Jensen
http://mattjensen.com
Seattle


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 12:24:38 -0700
From: "J. Andrew Rogers" <andrew at ceruleansystems.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] 11 steps to democracy
To: FoRK <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <BF682506.4758%andrew at ceruleansystems.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="US-ASCII"

On 10/4/05 12:00 PM, "mattj at newsblip.com" <mattj at newsblip.com> wrote:
> The President would have to respond to questions *and raspberries*.
Blair
> doesn't just get to blow hot air for five minutes, without
interruption, never
> answering the question.  In other words, it's the complete opposite of
a Bush
> "press conference".  Under this proposal Bush would face questions
directly
> from *Democrats*, and if he evaded he would be booed.  If you haven't
watched
> "Question Time" (on C-SPAN), you must.


I have seen this many times, and I do not see it as a useful procedure.
Entertaining? Absolutely.  But not particularly constructive considering
the
obscene level of grandstanding and media whoring that goes on for its
own
sake.

I understand what is being sought here, I just think that particular
mechanism is not the way to obtain it in practice, not without
tightening up
the rules significantly.


J. Andrew Rogers




------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 13:06:12 -0700
From: Mark Nottingham <mnot at mnot.net>
Subject: [FoRK] Technology/Innovation in AU
To: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <92086354-48D8-461E-BC88-C166B41095DD at mnot.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed


>> Im moving back to Australia in 2 weeks. Your'e all welcome to join  
>> me.

I'd be interested in hearing of stories from those who have done this  
(i.e., specifically, Australia). I hold AU residence, and one of the  
things that's keeping me from moving back is the relative dearth of  
work options for technical people who still want to actually think on  
the job.

It seems to me that there are plenty of talented people in AU (that I  
know personally or by reputation), but for whatever reason,  
innovation doesn't really take hold; there aren't many big companies  
that hire people for research / exploration (Telstra and CSIRO come  
to mind), and getting a startup going is very difficult, due to a  
lack of angel / seed funding.

Not that they don't know this; the subject has been explored to  
death, as far as I can see (e.g., "Backing Australia's Ability").

There was a nice article about this in (I think) the Journal a few  
years back, to the effect that Australia is doing so well because of  
IT; not because it innovates, but because it *implements* so very  
well, based on what others innovate.

P.S. There's a "Startup Funding Alternatives" panel by ANZA (sort of  
an AU/US business association) in Palo Alto tomorrow night:
   http://www.anzatechnet.com/conference2005/reg_all/panel_reg1.jsp
I was thinking of checking it out; anybody have any experience with  
this org?

--
Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 13:18:56 -0700
From: Mark Nottingham <mnot at mnot.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Hospitals and births  (was Re: (no subject))
To: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <29F56D43-0329-464B-9375-FED914DE1DC6 at mnot.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

It's not for a lack of trying in the Bay area; the nurses and  
Lactation Naz^H^H^H Consultants made us feel as if we might as well  
kill our first child rather than have a natural, anaesthetic-free,  
breast-fed baby. Never mind that he literally would have killed my  
wife if he was delivered naturally, and that, being 11 pounds, he  
couldn't physically be sustained by her alone. No, it's better for  
him to starve than to get formula, to listen to them.

That's why we had our second (three weeks ago) in a nice, Catholic  
hospital; they ask you once, and then respect your decisions, no  
questions asked. Go figure.

P.S. Since I already brushed against Godwin's Law there, we can  
hopefully avoid the traditional Breastfeeding Flame War. Can't you  
wait to reproduce, Rohit?


On 04/10/2005, at 9:58 AM, mattj at newsblip.com wrote:

> Here in Seattle, it's very progressive.  For example, we have the  
> highest rate
> in the country of moms who breastfeed when they leave the hospital.  
> (I don't
> know who collects these statistics nationally, but if you call a  
> Seattle
> hospital, they would tell you.)


--
Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:21:51 -0700
From: jm at jmason.org (Justin Mason)
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Technology/Innovation in AU 
To: Mark Nottingham <mnot at mnot.net>
Cc: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <20051004202151.649AF590237 at radish.jmason.org>

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
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Mark Nottingham writes:
>>> Im moving back to Australia in 2 weeks. Your'e all welcome to join  
>>> me.
>
>I'd be interested in hearing of stories from those who have done this  
>(i.e., specifically, Australia). I hold AU residence, and one of the  
>things that's keeping me from moving back is the relative dearth of  
>work options for technical people who still want to actually think on  
>the job.

FWIW, I agree this is a big, big problem.

I'm not too affected -- my work conditions in southern california here
are
very limited anyway, and Ireland actually compares very well to this
region in terms of techie job availability.  Anyone moving from the Bay
Area faces slim pickings, however.

- --j.

>It seems to me that there are plenty of talented people in AU (that I  
>know personally or by reputation), but for whatever reason,  
>innovation doesn't really take hold; there aren't many big companies  
>that hire people for research / exploration (Telstra and CSIRO come  
>to mind), and getting a startup going is very difficult, due to a  
>lack of angel / seed funding.
>
>Not that they don't know this; the subject has been explored to  
>death, as far as I can see (e.g., "Backing Australia's Ability").
>
>There was a nice article about this in (I think) the Journal a few  
>years back, to the effect that Australia is doing so well because of  
>IT; not because it innovates, but because it *implements* so very  
>well, based on what others innovate.
>
>P.S. There's a "Startup Funding Alternatives" panel by ANZA (sort of  
>an AU/US business association) in Palo Alto tomorrow night:
>   http://www.anzatechnet.com/conference2005/reg_all/panel_reg1.jsp
>I was thinking of checking it out; anybody have any experience with  
>this org?
>
>--
>Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/
>
>_______________________________________________
>FoRK mailing list
>http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
>
>
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------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 14:32:50 -0600
From: mattj at newsblip.com
Subject: Re: [FoRK] 11 steps to democracy
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <20051004143250.4srgynp1q6sk48ck at 216.194.106.19>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=ISO-8859-1;	format="flowed"

Quoting "J. Andrew Rogers" <andrew at ceruleansystems.com>:

>> The  President would have to respond to questions *and raspberries*.
...
>
> I have seen this many times, and I do not see it as a useful
procedure.


In the current U.S. context, I think such a requirement would destroy
the Bush
Administration.  He simply stinks in any format where he is challenged,
and
this structure would challenge him repeatedly, and heatedly, for a solid
hour
every week.  In fact, a single hour of this would challenge him more
than all
his interviews in the last 5 years put together.

I'm not advocating Question Time because it would expose Bush as 
incompetent and
arrogant (though it would). Rather, the fact that it would make his 
incompetence
and arrogance obvious to even staunch supporters would show how weak and
compliant the U.S. press has become. *That's* the real value here;
stripping
away the adoration of the presidency, and the cult of personality, so
that the
media feel free to investigate and challenge more than they do now.

-Matt Jensen
http://mattjensen.com
Seattle



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 14:00:10 -0700
From: Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>
Subject: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: Fork <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <8F4FCFE4-1661-4CC5-B82E-3B43D19FB635 at cs.ucsc.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

http://www.ning.com/

It's like legos for social app builders. From the website, "Ning is a  
free online service (or, as we like to call it, a Playground) for  
building and using social applications.
Social apps are web applications that enable anyone to match,  
transact, and communicate with other people."

Interesting, the business model appears to be the following: make it  
easy for people to create social apps, provide free hosting, then get  
revenue from ads, as well as from storage.

The main flaw, that I can see, is that any really successful business  
using Ning might feel uncomfortable with Ning having so much control  
over their fate. Still, it seems very attractive for performing rapid  
prototyping and deployment of social apps.

- Jim


------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 21:08:46 +0000
From: "Russell Turpin" <deafbox at hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: [FoRK] Re: (no subject)
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <BAY107-F30CD311164C2A987A6E71EBC830 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Corinna:
>At any rate, they do all sorts of things to us at birth
>without our consent..

Anyone want to start a pool on when they start
capturing infants' DNA for inclusion in a national
ID database?




------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 11:10:58 -1000
From: Lucas Gonze <lgonze at panix.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>
Cc: Fork <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <4342EFE2.9040803 at panix.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Jim Whitehead wrote:

> The main flaw, that I can see, is that any really successful business

> using Ning might feel uncomfortable with Ning having so much control  
> over their fate. Still, it seems very attractive for performing rapid

> prototyping and deployment of social apps.


True and true.  However I know that they're working on ways to allow 
developers to control their own fate, for example by using their own 
domain name.

(I've been working with Ning as a friendly third party for a few months 
now).

- Lucas




------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 23:12:06 +0200
From: Eugen Leitl <eugen at leitl.org>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Re: (no subject)
To: Russell Turpin <deafbox at hotmail.com>, forkit! <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <20051004211206.GO2249 at leitl.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

On Tue, Oct 04, 2005 at 09:08:46PM +0000, Russell Turpin wrote:

> Anyone want to start a pool on when they start
> capturing infants' DNA for inclusion in a national
> ID database?

Blame Canadia!
http://www.hackcanada.com/canadian/freedom/canadna.html

-- 
Eugen* Leitl <a href="http://leitl.org">leitl</a>
______________________________________________________________
ICBM: 48.07100, 11.36820            http://www.leitl.org
8B29F6BE: 099D 78BA 2FD3 B014 B08A  7779 75B0 2443 8B29 F6BE

------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 17:12:25 -0400
From: "B.K. DeLong" <bkdelong at pobox.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>,Fork <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <6.2.3.4.2.20051004171001.058725e0 at mail.brain-stream.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

At 05:00 PM 10/4/2005, Jim Whitehead wrote:
>The main flaw, that I can see, is that any really successful business
>using Ning might feel uncomfortable with Ning having so much control
>over their fate. Still, it seems very attractive for performing rapid
>prototyping and deployment of social apps.

Agreed - there's a lot of opportunity for Google Earth Dynamic Data 
Layer Apps to be hosted there, I believe. Hopefully they have an 
infrastructure to handle massive use of such apps.


--
B.K. DeLong
bkdelong at pobox.com
+1.617.797.8471 (Note new number)

http://www.brain-stream.com               Play.
http://www.the-leaky-cauldron.org        Potter.
http://www.hackerfoundation.org          Future.
http://www.wkdelong.org           Son.


PGP Fingerprint:
38D4 D4D4 5819 8667 DFD5  A62D AF61 15FF 297D 67FE

FOAF:
http://foaf.brain-stream.org 



------------------------------

Message: 12
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 14:20:41 -0700
From: "Strata R. Chalup" <strata at virtual.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: Fork <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <4342F229.2070606 at virtual.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed


I'm looking forward to trying app-building once they catch up on
developer requests.

SRC

Lucas Gonze wrote:

> Jim Whitehead wrote:
> 
>> The main flaw, that I can see, is that any really successful business

>> using Ning might feel uncomfortable with Ning having so much control

>> over their fate. Still, it seems very attractive for performing rapid

>> prototyping and deployment of social apps.
> 
> 
> 
> True and true.  However I know that they're working on ways to allow 
> developers to control their own fate, for example by using their own 
> domain name.
> 
> (I've been working with Ning as a friendly third party for a few
months 
> now).
> 
> - Lucas
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
> 

-- 
========================================================================
Strata R Chalup [KF6NBZ]                         strata "@" virtual.net
Virtual.Net Inc                                  http://www.virtual.net/
           ** Strategic IT for the Growing Enterprise **
========================================================================
=


------------------------------

Message: 13
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 22:35:41 +0100
From: Andy Armstrong <andy at hexten.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>
Cc: Fork <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <A96D6DEA-11D8-41D7-B64B-78EC78E785A8 at hexten.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

On 4 Oct 2005, at 22:00, Jim Whitehead wrote:
> Interesting, the business model appears to be the following: make  
> it easy for people to create social apps, provide free hosting,  
> then get revenue from ads, as well as from storage.

I've just signed up for a developer account - I'll let you know how  
it goes.

-- 
Andy Armstrong, hexten.net



------------------------------

Message: 14
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 22:36:18 +0100
From: Andy Armstrong <andy at hexten.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: Strata R.Chalup <strata at virtual.net>
Cc: Fork <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <E8417AA0-9382-47AB-BAC7-4C529E3D9A6D at hexten.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

On 4 Oct 2005, at 22:20, Strata R. Chalup wrote:
> I'm looking forward to trying app-building once they catch up on  
> developer requests.

Ah - sorry for the 'me too' :)

-- 
Andy Armstrong, hexten.net



------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 16:34:46 -0500
From: "Corinna" <schultz at harlingen.isd.tenet.edu>
Subject: [FoRK] Re: Hospitals and births  (was Re: (no subject))
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <dhushn$ppr$1 at sea.gmane.org>


"Mark Nottingham" <mnot at mnot.net> wrote
> P.S. Since I already brushed against Godwin's Law there, we can
hopefully 
> avoid the traditional Breastfeeding Flame War.

Everyone's situation is different -- that's why the book is called "The 
Womanly *ART* of Breastfeeding" :)  And, yes, it really does depend on
where 
you live, and the surrounding culture...

(generic rant ahead, not directed at anyone in particular)
There's no need to flame. There's no need to be a Na** about it,
either... I 
don't understand people who feel like in order for *their* choices to be

justified they have to convince the entire world to do as they did...

I did was I thought was best for me. You (generically) did what you
thought 
was best for you. End of story.  We (people in newsgroups, etc) exist to
be 
a source of education and support for people who need it.  I probably 
wouldn't have made the choices I did if it wasn't for what I learned
through 
newsgroups, and my life would be much less richer as a result.

-Corinna 





------------------------------

Message: 16
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 15:00:50 -0700
From: Adam L Beberg <beberg at mithral.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Re: (no subject)
To: Russell Turpin <deafbox at hotmail.com>
Cc: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <4342FB92.60907 at mithral.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Russell Turpin wrote on 10/4/2005 2:08 PM:
> Corinna:
> 
>> At any rate, they do all sorts of things to us at birth
>> without our consent..
> 
> Anyone want to start a pool on when they start
> capturing infants' DNA for inclusion in a national
> ID database?

Umm... aren't you a little late?

I'm as paranoid as the next conspiracy theorist, but I dont get the big 
deal about DNA. The benefits are HUGE in having this data, and the 
drawbacks are only things you ALREADY know.

Bob is at risk for cancer, well no sh*t his dad died of it. Alice might 
get breast cancer, again no sh*t sherlock she's female. Insurance 
companies already have ways of dumping those people quickly and quietly.

Now the "scary" stuff is testing for genes relating to brains and other 
things. Little bob is falling behind in school, you already know 
something is wrong, no need to look at the DNA to confirm he lacks a 
brain gene. No nobel prize for him, but that was never going to happen 
anyway.

And in 20 years, all those genetic errors will be eliminated BEFORE 
birth, so it's a complete non-issue after that. Not to mention all the 
enhancements/resistances that are just around the corner. 6 color 
vision, 2x strength, no serious diseases, livespans in the 250+ years
range.

This is all a moot point, as the machines will have passed us making 
almost all human workers obsolete anyway. Even the Chinese will be 2-3 
orders of magnitude too expensive, and they are slave labor.

Assuming any of us survive bird flu, the oil wars, the water wars, and 
the oceans boiling off from global warming.

So stop worrying about things that don't matter. Get some survival and 
combat training instead.

-- 
Adam L. Beberg
http://www.mithral.com/~beberg/


------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 23:35:07 +0100
From: "Dr. Robert Harley" <robert.harley at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Re: (no subject)
To: FoRK <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID:
	<bfcef1040510041535o64bc4606pccba40913dee9587 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Adam "Duncan" Beberg (cubed bend anagram):
>Assuming any of us survive bird flu, the oil wars, the water wars, and
>the oceans boiling off from global warming.

Next time you feel like taking a dump, aim for the porcelain eh?

R


------------------------------

Message: 18
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 16:37:38 -0600
From: mattj at newsblip.com
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <20051004163738.oas2w3bjkxa8s804 at 216.194.106.19>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=ISO-8859-1;	format="flowed"

Quoting Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>:

> The main flaw, that I can see, is that any really successful business 
>  using Ning might feel uncomfortable with Ning having so much control 
>  over their fate.

Very interesting!
Another possible flaw (for some) is that the terms allow anyone to
freely (and
easily) clone your code and use it as the basis of another project.  But
if
that doesn't bother you, it sounds intriguing.

-Matt Jensen
http://mattjensen.com
Seattle


------------------------------

Message: 19
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 19:04:28 -0400
From: Damien Morton <fork at bitfurnace.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Technology/Innovation in AU
To: Mark Nottingham <mnot at mnot.net>
Cc: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <43430A7C.7090302 at bitfurnace.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Ive done some feeling out of the job market on some mailing lists, and 
the consensus seems to be that if you've got some talent, youll be 
snaffled up in a heartbeat.

I left Australia for the very reason you gave below, but at that time I 
was making the mistake of asking permission to do what I wanted. Im a 
bit older now, and have a clearer idea of what I want to do. Ive also 
still got all my wall street connections and am hoping to exploit that 
from afar.

>>> Im moving back to Australia in 2 weeks. Your'e all welcome to join
me.
> 
> 
> I'd be interested in hearing of stories from those who have done this

> (i.e., specifically, Australia). I hold AU residence, and one of the  
> things that's keeping me from moving back is the relative dearth of  
> work options for technical people who still want to actually think on

> the job.
> 
> It seems to me that there are plenty of talented people in AU (that I

> know personally or by reputation), but for whatever reason,
innovation 
> doesn't really take hold; there aren't many big companies  that hire 
> people for research / exploration (Telstra and CSIRO come  to mind),
and 
> getting a startup going is very difficult, due to a  lack of angel / 
> seed funding.
> 
> Not that they don't know this; the subject has been explored to
death, 
> as far as I can see (e.g., "Backing Australia's Ability").
> 
> There was a nice article about this in (I think) the Journal a few  
> years back, to the effect that Australia is doing so well because of  
> IT; not because it innovates, but because it *implements* so very
well, 
> based on what others innovate.
> 
> P.S. There's a "Startup Funding Alternatives" panel by ANZA (sort of
an 
> AU/US business association) in Palo Alto tomorrow night:
>   http://www.anzatechnet.com/conference2005/reg_all/panel_reg1.jsp
> I was thinking of checking it out; anybody have any experience with  
> this org?
> 
> -- 
> Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/
> 
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
> 
> 



------------------------------

Message: 20
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 13:08:09 -1000
From: Lucas Gonze <lgonze at panix.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: mattj at newsblip.com
Cc: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <43430B59.5020909 at panix.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

mattj at newsblip.com wrote:

> Quoting Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>:
>
>> The main flaw, that I can see, is that any really successful business

>>  using Ning might feel uncomfortable with Ning having so much control

>>  over their fate.
>
>
> Very interesting!
> Another possible flaw (for some) is that the terms allow anyone to 
> freely (and
> easily) clone your code and use it as the basis of another project.  
> But if
> that doesn't bother you, it sounds intriguing.


The answer to these two issues is related: one possible premium service 
is the ability to keep your code private.

(*I am not speaking for 24HL!*)

- Lucas



------------------------------

Message: 21
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 19:18:34 -0400
From: Luis Villa <luis.villa at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Ning, a social app construction set
To: lucas at gonze.com
Cc: mattj at newsblip.com, fork at xent.com
Message-ID:
	<2cb10c440510041618o5518473cq3f7ce62b817514e7 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

On 10/4/05, Lucas Gonze <lgonze at panix.com> wrote:
> mattj at newsblip.com wrote:
>
> > Quoting Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>:
> >
> >> The main flaw, that I can see, is that any really successful
business
> >>  using Ning might feel uncomfortable with Ning having so much
control
> >>  over their fate.
> >
> >
> > Very interesting!
> > Another possible flaw (for some) is that the terms allow anyone to
> > freely (and
> > easily) clone your code and use it as the basis of another project.
> > But if
> > that doesn't bother you, it sounds intriguing.
>
>
> The answer to these two issues is related: one possible premium
service
> is the ability to keep your code private.
>
> (*I am not speaking for 24HL!*)

They do mention this possibility in their FAQ, FWIW.

Luis


------------------------------

Message: 22
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 21:45:18 -0400
From: Gavin Thomas Nicol <gtn at rbii.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Technology/Innovation in AU
To: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <65E1C33D-230B-4EC4-9461-E7928D764D6B at rbii.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed


On Oct 4, 2005, at 4:06 PM, Mark Nottingham wrote:

>
>
>>> Im moving back to Australia in 2 weeks. Your'e all welcome to  
>>> join me.
>>>
>
> I'd be interested in hearing of stories from those who have done  
> this (i.e., specifically, Australia).

Me too... I keep thinking of moving back to NZ... especially with  
looming college tuition etc. but I'm afraid the grey cells would have  
a problem adjusting.




------------------------------

Message: 23
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 09:47:45 +0800
From: "James Tauber" <jtauber at jtauber.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Technology/Innovation in AU
To: "Mark Nottingham" <mnot at mnot.net>, "forkit!Now" <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <1128476865.18729.244427093 at webmail.messagingengine.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"


I'm fortunate enough to live in Australia but work in the US. Best of
both worlds.

I love living in Australia but got frustrated working there
(for some of the reasons you mention and some that you don't such as the
complete suspicion of anyone successful in business and too much of an
us-them attitude between workers and management)

James

On Tue, 4 Oct 2005 13:06:12 -0700, "Mark Nottingham" <mnot at mnot.net>
said:
> 
> >> Im moving back to Australia in 2 weeks. Your'e all welcome to join

> >> me.
> 
> I'd be interested in hearing of stories from those who have done this

> (i.e., specifically, Australia). I hold AU residence, and one of the  
> things that's keeping me from moving back is the relative dearth of  
> work options for technical people who still want to actually think on

> the job.
> 
> It seems to me that there are plenty of talented people in AU (that I

> know personally or by reputation), but for whatever reason,  
> innovation doesn't really take hold; there aren't many big companies  
> that hire people for research / exploration (Telstra and CSIRO come  
> to mind), and getting a startup going is very difficult, due to a  
> lack of angel / seed funding.
> 
> Not that they don't know this; the subject has been explored to  
> death, as far as I can see (e.g., "Backing Australia's Ability").
> 
> There was a nice article about this in (I think) the Journal a few  
> years back, to the effect that Australia is doing so well because of  
> IT; not because it innovates, but because it *implements* so very  
> well, based on what others innovate.
> 
> P.S. There's a "Startup Funding Alternatives" panel by ANZA (sort of  
> an AU/US business association) in Palo Alto tomorrow night:
>    http://www.anzatechnet.com/conference2005/reg_all/panel_reg1.jsp
> I was thinking of checking it out; anybody have any experience with  
> this org?
> 
> --
> Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/
> 
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
-- 
  James Tauber               http://jtauber.com/
  journeyman of some    http://jtauber.com/blog/



------------------------------

Message: 24
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 22:17:01 -0400
From: Culture Lab <info at pulpculture.org>
Subject: [FoRK] DBs and online forms
To: <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID:
	<6.1.2.0.2.20051004215219.02897a58 at pop-server.tampabay.rr.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Earlier today, we had a meeting with a guy who runs a mortgage company.
We 
went there to talk about Web design and getting his T1 running so we can

admin the server and some Web sites for him.

As we got talking, he said one of his biggest headaches was the time 
involved in data processing.

1. users enter information in an online app.
2. info is e-mailed to his staff
3. she has to fill out loan apps by hand.

He's interested in developing a way to have that information entered 
directly onto an official app, and it must look just like the offical
app 
from BigLoanCo, via PDF.

Acrobat's latest lets you create interactive forms but, as near as I can

tell, the user would have to save the PDF to her hard drive, fill it
out, 
and print it, mailing via landmail or e-mail. An alternative would be to

have them fill it out, re-save it with new information, and then use an 
upload file link (which is open to all the attendant abuses, some of
which 
can be addressed).

AS you can guess, though, this is simply too many steps for most people.

It's a temporary workaround, for now, but ideally he's looking for 
something else. Even more ideally, he's looking for something else that
he 
can then turn around and sell to others in the same biz.

So, the next step is to see if anyone's created such an app, translating

either raw data right into a predefined form or created a database
backend 
to do live processing of the input to the Acrobat PDF file on line. Am I

making any sense? (This isn't my field, which is why I'm asking around
here.)

Anyway, I figure someone has already got to be doing this. As far as
this 
guy knows, though, he hasn't seen it in the mortgage lending biz.

Thanks,

Kelley



Culture Lab | Pulp Culture Collective

http://www.pulpculture.org
http://blog.pulpculture.org



------------------------------

Message: 25
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 19:38:11 -0700
From: Bill Humphries <bill at whump.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] DBs and online forms
To: Culture Lab <info at pulpculture.org>
Cc: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <1DF46AC5-1D67-40F2-AD90-88552DCDBB26 at whump.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

On Oct 4, 2005, at 7:17 PM, Culture Lab wrote:

> So, the next step is to see if anyone's created such an app,  
> translating either raw data right into a predefined form or created  
> a database backend to do live processing of the input to the  
> Acrobat PDF file on line. Am I making any sense? (This isn't my  
> field, which is why I'm asking around here.)

Take a look at the Apache Cocoon framework and the Lenya CMS (built  
on top of Cocoon.)

Coocon's all about document creation pipelines, and it sounds like  
something that can use XSL-FO to generate "official big bank co"  
forms would fit your needs.

-- whump



------------------------------

Message: 26
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 19:38:51 -0700
From: Mark Nottingham <mnot at mnot.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Technology/Innovation in AU
To: James Tauber <jtauber at jtauber.com>
Cc: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <F9696BC0-2071-449F-80D7-C550073EB6F9 at mnot.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

You tall poppy, you ;)


On 04/10/2005, at 6:47 PM, James Tauber wrote:

>
> I'm fortunate enough to live in Australia but work in the US. Best of
> both worlds.
>
> I love living in Australia but got frustrated working there
> (for some of the reasons you mention and some that you don't such  
> as the
> complete suspicion of anyone successful in business and too much of an
> us-them attitude between workers and management)
>
> James
>
> On Tue, 4 Oct 2005 13:06:12 -0700, "Mark Nottingham" <mnot at mnot.net>
> said:
>
>>
>>
>>>> Im moving back to Australia in 2 weeks. Your'e all welcome to join
>>>> me.
>>>>
>>
>> I'd be interested in hearing of stories from those who have done this
>> (i.e., specifically, Australia). I hold AU residence, and one of the
>> things that's keeping me from moving back is the relative dearth of
>> work options for technical people who still want to actually think on
>> the job.
>>
>> It seems to me that there are plenty of talented people in AU (that I
>> know personally or by reputation), but for whatever reason,
>> innovation doesn't really take hold; there aren't many big companies
>> that hire people for research / exploration (Telstra and CSIRO come
>> to mind), and getting a startup going is very difficult, due to a
>> lack of angel / seed funding.
>>
>> Not that they don't know this; the subject has been explored to
>> death, as far as I can see (e.g., "Backing Australia's Ability").
>>
>> There was a nice article about this in (I think) the Journal a few
>> years back, to the effect that Australia is doing so well because of
>> IT; not because it innovates, but because it *implements* so very
>> well, based on what others innovate.
>>
>> P.S. There's a "Startup Funding Alternatives" panel by ANZA (sort of
>> an AU/US business association) in Palo Alto tomorrow night:
>>    http://www.anzatechnet.com/conference2005/reg_all/panel_reg1.jsp
>> I was thinking of checking it out; anybody have any experience with
>> this org?
>>
>> --
>> Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> FoRK mailing list
>> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
>>
> -- 
>   James Tauber               http://jtauber.com/
>   journeyman of some    http://jtauber.com/blog/
>
>
>


--
Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/



------------------------------

Message: 27
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 2005 20:41:48 -0600
From: Marty Halvorson <marty at halvorson.us>
Subject: [FoRK] Palm or iPOD?
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <5.1.0.14.0.20051004203557.00a81cc0 at mail.cybermesa.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

My daughter has just informed me she really, really needs a PDA.  The 
question is which one?  I don't have a clue.  I've never felt the need
for 
one, and now that I'm retired, I definitely don't need one.

So, since many FoRKers seem to be into having the latest and greatest 
technology, I figured you all could give me some advice on whether the
iPOD 
or the Palm is preferable.  Just remember I'm retired now and cost will
be 
an issue.

Peace,

Marty Halvorson
marty at halvorson.us




------------------------------

Message: 28
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 19:50:35 -0700
From: "Ian Andrew Bell (FoRK)" <fork at ianbell.com>
Subject: [FoRK] Vancouver's Still On Top... (The Economist)
To: forkit!Now List <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <C948ACE5-1171-4598-A0F2-317AD3567382 at ianbell.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

There's something kind of nice about living in a country where no one  
is trying to kill you because your government decided to trample the  
family garden with a M1A2.  There's also something nice about living  
in a country where the prospect of actually receiving treatment for  
your broken leg leads only to a concern over the length of your  
recovery and not over the number of mortgages you'll have to take out  
to repay the bill.  Also, the prospect of /not/ being arrested by  
your own gubbermint for making "terrorist threats" when you yelled an  
an Airline representative is nice, too.

Vancouver, Montreal, and Toronto were all in the Top 5.  ALL of  
Vancouver's 5 largest cities made the list as favourable.  We haven't  
got things perfectly worked out up here, but we're doing something  
right.

Of course, the only thing wrong about these sorts of lists is the  
effect caused when everyone tries to move here.  If you do, bring  
companies with you.  Vancouver is sadly lacking in industry and  
commerce.

-Ian.


---------
http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/10/04/eui.survey/index.html

http://store.eiu.com/index.asp? 
layout=pr_story&press_id=660001866&ref=pr_list

Vancouver tops liveability ranking according to a new survey by the  
Economist Intelligence Unit

A new survey by the Economist Intelligence Unit assessing the  
"liveability" of 127 cities worldwide has found Vancouver to be the  
most attractive destination. The survey shows cities in Canada,  
Australia, Austria and Switzerland as the most ideal destinations  
thanks to a widespread availability of goods and services, low  
personal risk and an effective infrastructure.

Jon Copestake, editor of the report, comments: "In the current global  
political climate, it is no surprise that the most desirable  
destinations are those with a lower perceived threat of terrorism."

The Economist Intelligence Unit's LIVEABILITY RANKING, part of the  
Worldwide Cost of Living Survey, assesses living conditions in 127  
cities around the world by looking at nearly 40 individual indicators  
grouped into five categories: stability; healthcare; culture and  
environment; education; and infrastructure. The survey gives a rating  
of 0%-100% and judges a city with a lower score to be the more  
attractive destination. A rating of 20% is where real problems are  
seen to begin - anything over 50% places severe restrictions on  
lifestyle.

Is west the best?

Sixty-three cities - almost half of those surveyed in total - fall  
into the top liveability bracket. This reflects the fact that many  
global business centres have a developed infrastructure and  
widespread availability. Still, the overwhelming majority of cities  
in the top liveability range are based in western Europe and North  
America.
Only three cities in eastern Europe fall into this bracket along with  
13 cities from Asia. All cities in North America and western Europe  
have ratings below 20%. In contrast all cities in Latin America,  
Africa and the Middle East exceed this.
The worst destinations in the survey are those of Algiers and Port  
Moresby in Papua New Guinea - where many aspects of daily life  
present challenges. All ten cities where the liveability index  
exceeds 50% are in Asia, Africa or the Middle East.



------------------------------

Message: 29
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 19:51:22 -0700
From: "Ian Andrew Bell (FoRK)" <fork at ianbell.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Palm or iPOD?
To: Marty Halvorson <marty at halvorson.us>
Cc: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <48ACE2FA-00B8-4AB8-8A8A-19DD8438620B at ianbell.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

She needs a Smart Phone.

Get her a Sony-Ericsson K750 or W800.

The W800 is all three.

-Ian.


On 4-Oct-05, at 7:41 PM, Marty Halvorson wrote:

> My daughter has just informed me she really, really needs a PDA.   
> The question is which one?  I don't have a clue.  I've never felt  
> the need for one, and now that I'm retired, I definitely don't need  
> one.
>
> So, since many FoRKers seem to be into having the latest and  
> greatest technology, I figured you all could give me some advice on  
> whether the iPOD or the Palm is preferable.  Just remember I'm  
> retired now and cost will be an issue.
>
> Peace,
>
> Marty Halvorson
> marty at halvorson.us
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
>
>



------------------------------

Message: 30
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 22:03:48 -0500
From: Ken Meltsner <meltsner at alum.mit.edu>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] DBs and online forms
To: Fork <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID:
	<692a81590510042003g26f9dc3fpe684452d51db7e3a at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Try a google search for "online form hosting" -- there are a couple of
companies that sound useful, with online form building tools and
various backend capabilities.

www.formrouter.com in particular looks interesting, and has some sort
of arrangement with Adobe.

Ken


------------------------------

Message: 31
Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 20:40:38 -0700
From: Aaron Burt <aaron at bavariati.org>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] DBs and online forms
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <20051005034037.GA8465 at bavariati.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

On Tue, Oct 04, 2005 at 10:17:01PM -0400, Culture Lab wrote:
> 1. users enter information in an online app.
> 2. info is e-mailed to his staff
> 3. she has to fill out loan apps by hand.
> 
> He's interested in developing a way to have that information entered 
> directly onto an official app, and it must look just like the offical
app 
> from BigLoanCo, via PDF.

This is a badly underserved and potentially lucrative market (think
insurance/medicare billing).  Last time I was involved in an effort to
fill out official forms from a database, we were looking at using
PDF::Reuse: http://search.cpan.org/~larslund/PDF-Reuse-0.32/Reuse.pm

Advantages: Produces a print-, FAX-, email- and archive-able version
of the form; many official forms are available as PDFs (re-creating an
official form yourself can lead to bureaucratic nitpicking); can work
with scanned forms; easy handling of multipage forms.

Disadvantages: Possibly large files; PDFs aren't directly printable
(though printing can be automated with Ghostscript).

Weird idear: how 'bout a fee-based website that lets folks fill out
forms online, then produces a PDF and/or FAXes/mails 'em for a fee?  
"Why retype when you can cut'n'paste?  Why buy stamps?  Fill it out
before 8:30PM PST and we'll guarantee it gets postmarked that day!"

Just send me some shares,
  Aaron


------------------------------

Message: 32
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 00:06:09 -0700
From: Gordon Mohr <gojomofork at xavvy.com>
Subject: National DNA database? Re: [FoRK] Re: (no subject)
To: Russell Turpin <deafbox at hotmail.com>
Cc: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <43437B61.2000500 at xavvy.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Russell Turpin wrote:
> Corinna:
> 
>> At any rate, they do all sorts of things to us at birth
>> without our consent..
> 
> 
> Anyone want to start a pool on when they start
> capturing infants' DNA for inclusion in a national
> ID database?

Would a national umbilical cord blood bank and tissue-matching
registry, as passed by the House recently, be a small first step
towards this?

  Banking on cord blood
  Oct 3, 2005
 
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-adcova4452831oct03,0,6045565,print
.story

  "In the meantime, Congress is considering legislation that would
   create a federally funded national registry of donated cord blood,
   which has successfully been used in stem cell transplants between
   unrelated people."

  "The House of Representatives recently approved a bill granting
   $79 million to build a national public registry of at least
   150,000 donated cord blood units. The future of that legislation
   rests with the Senate."


- Gordon


------------------------------

Message: 33
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 00:57:50 -0700
From: "Strata R. Chalup" <strata at virtual.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Palm or iPOD?
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <4343877E.3000006 at virtual.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed


Get her a Hipster PDA.

It's extremely extensible, won't go obsolete, interoperates with any
flat-bed 
scanner or photocopier for data backups, etc etc.

SRC

Marty Halvorson wrote:

> My daughter has just informed me she really, really needs a PDA.  The 
> question is which one?  I don't have a clue.  I've never felt the need

> for one, and now that I'm retired, I definitely don't need one.
> 
> So, since many FoRKers seem to be into having the latest and greatest 
> technology, I figured you all could give me some advice on whether the

> iPOD or the Palm is preferable.  Just remember I'm retired now and
cost 
> will be an issue.
> 
> Peace,
> 
> Marty Halvorson
> marty at halvorson.us
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
> 

-- 
========================================================================
Strata R Chalup [KF6NBZ]                         strata "@" virtual.net
Virtual.Net Inc                                  http://www.virtual.net/
           ** Strategic IT for the Growing Enterprise **
========================================================================
=


------------------------------

Message: 34
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 03:53:57 -0700
From: Adam L Beberg <beberg at mithral.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Three most import attributes for a Bush
	appointment
To: "Strata R. Chalup" <strata at virtual.net>
Cc: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <4343B0C5.40407 at mithral.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Strata R. Chalup wrote on 10/4/2005 12:59 AM:
> 
> Are you planning to be dead then, or living in another country, or
what?

No, probably, uploaded?

By the time I finish my PhD, there will be no computer science students 
left in the US for me to teach. Everyone knows all the tech jobs are 
headed for places you earn $200/month. Between DARPA, NIH, and NSF 
cutbacks, there will also be no money for non-military research.

So I will probably not be looking for jobs here.

Europe is nice, but likely to reglaciate when the gulf stream stops and 
oil prices are already causing economic problems. Asia is where all the 
economic action is, and they can think more then 1 quarterly statement 
ahead, but the languages and being a 6'1" near albino means jobs there 
are probably out of the question. Lots of relatives in Canada, the 
people are nice too. Who knows.

But I think it's safe to assume you'll see an Atlas Shrugged scale evac 
of anyone with resources out of the US when the shit hits the fan and 
the 20 dollar bill becomes toilet paper.


-- 
Adam L. Beberg
http://www.mithral.com/~beberg/



------------------------------

Message: 35
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 14:27:20 +0200
From: Eugen Leitl <eugen at leitl.org>
Subject: [FoRK] [tlauriau at magma.ca: [Geowanking] 'Folksonomy' Carries
	Classifieds Beyond SWF and 'For Sale']
To: forkit! <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <20051005122720.GV2249 at leitl.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

----- Forwarded message from "Tracey P. Lauriault" <tlauriau at magma.ca>
-----

From: "Tracey P. Lauriault" <tlauriau at magma.ca>
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 08:15:17 -0400
To: geowanking at lists.burri.to
Subject: [Geowanking] 'Folksonomy' Carries Classifieds Beyond SWF and
'For
	Sale'
User-Agent: Mozilla Thunderbird 1.0.2 (Windows/20050317)
Reply-To: geowanking at lists.burri.to

The New York Times <http://www.nytimes.com/>
------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 5, 2005


 'Folksonomy' Carries Classifieds Beyond SWF and 'For Sale'

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/05/technology/techspecial/05ethan.html?th
=&emc=th&pagewanted=print

By ETHAN TODRAS-WHITEHILL

NETWORKING sites on the Web started as online personal ads, and most are

still built around the desire to meet people. But there is a new, 
rapidly growing generation of networking sites built around purposes, 
not people.

These sites connect people by their interests and goals. Three such 
sites are del.icio.us, which lets users bookmark Web sites and share the

bookmarks with others; 43things.com <http://43things.com>, which loosely

connects users with shared goals like learning to play the guitar; and 
PledgeBank.com <http://PledgeBank.com>, a London-based nonprofit site 
that brings users together to participate in civic actions, like 
starting a political group or giving blood.

Connecting people online this way is not new. Dial-up bulletin boards in

the 1980's, Usenet discussion groups from the 80's and 90's and blogs 
today all allow users to connect with like-minded people over topics 
that interest them.

Until recently, however, groups needed a critical mass to have such a 
Web presence, and finding them could be difficult. Idea- and 
activity-oriented networking sites create ad hoc homes for many small 
groups and interests, and make them more easily accessible.

The form of information classification used on del.icio.us has become 
known as "folksonomy," a play on the word "taxonomy," coined by Thomas 
Vander Wal, a Web production manager who is an avid user of del.icio.us.

Here is a look at these three genres:

Del.icio.us Its intent is to allow users to create Web pages of personal

bookmarks accessible from anywhere, share them with other users and view

others' bookmarks. The site, started in September 2003, has 200,000 
users, said its founder, Joshua Schachter.

Networking was not the main focus of the site's design, Mr. Schachter 
said, but evolved out of shared activity. Each bookmark is "tagged," or 
filed under a term of the user's choice; through tags, users work 
together to categorize the Web, and it is in that context that a network

forms. Users meet on del.icio.us in their natural Web environment: the 
act of finding information they care about.

Mr. Vander Wal is passionate about this new user-classified information 
structure, so he closely follows the Web sites that others tag with the 
term "folksonomy" and related words. As any user can, he signed up to 
receive notifications when new bookmarks with this tag come in, and he 
estimated that he received 20 such messages a day.

Over time, Mr. Vander Wal has found himself following the bookmarking 
activities of specific users who share his interests. That is usually as

far as the contacts go, but not always. Last January, a lively blog 
discussion led to an e-mail exchange among Mr. Vander Wal, David Smith 
and Michal Migurski, all folksonomy-focused del.icio.us users. Mr. 
Vander Wal met Mr. Migurski in person that month in San Francisco.

"It's difficult to explain to my wife what I'm doing, who these people 
are or how I've met them," he said. "But they're insanely helpful with 
the issues I'm interested in."

43things.com This is one of the newer sites that use folksonomies with a

purpose. Users keep lists of goals ranging from skill-building "learn 
about wine" to career-oriented "get a promotion" to whimsical "shave my 
head into a mohawk." Users can leave entries about their progress toward

a goal, comment on others' entries, join teams as a sign of greater 
commitment and cheer other people's progress.

The site also allows participants to tag goals, and those goals 
integrate with sites and photos sharing the same tag on del.icio.us and 
Flickr.

Since the site's start in January, it has acquired more than 71,000 
users and gets more than 600,000 page views daily.

Chuq Yang, a Washington resident and deputy director of technology for 
the Democratic National Committee, is a 43Things power user. In six 
months, he has accomplished 553 goals, which tend to be technical 
("master Linux"), quotidian ("stop biting my nails") and occasionally 
romantic ("believe in love"). He spends three hours a day checking the 
site, and he thinks the time spent is worthwhile.

Mr. Yang sees the initial value of 43Things as a handy place to keep a 
to-do list. He attributes much of his increase in productivity, however,

to the social network built around that list. He spends his three daily 
hours cheering other people on with their goals and leaving messages 
about entries in other users' journals. When he does so, he usually gets

a cheer or a comment in return, which he describes as "a gentle nudge 
toward getting something done."

PledgeBank This site also builds networks around ideas or goals, letting

users create pledges in the form of "I will do something, if a certain 
number of people will help me do it." Other users can then "sign" the 
pledge and agree to do it.

The Internet has been used extensively for civic activity, but 
PledgeBank enables smaller-scale actions as well as large ones. Recent 
pledges include 54 people agreeing to compliment five people a day for a

month, and 15 people agreeing to buy books exclusively from independent 
booksellers for the rest of 2005.

Most pledges connect users once; as with 43Things, it is the confidence 
that others are pursuing a common goal that helps spur individuals to 
action.

The site provides tools to support individuals in getting their pledges 
met. Each pledge is given its own uncomplicated Web address, a flier for

the pledge creator to print and a text-message address so people can 
sign up by cellphone. Pledge creators are also given the ability to 
contact their list of pledge signers.

"When you lower barriers to civic action, more things get done," said 
Tom Steinberg, director of mySociety, an organization that promotes 
civic activity and created PledgeBank.

While based in London, PledgeBank has recently added support for pledges

in the United States, and Mr. Steinberg hopes to extend the site to 
still other countries. Even before the upgrade, however, one campaign in

the United States was already using the site.

In protest of the United States Supreme Court's ruling in June that 
government can use its power of eminent domain to promote private 
economic development, a group called Freestar Media has been trying to 
get the government of Weare, N.H., to give Justice David H. Souter's 
home and property to Freestar to build a hotel named the Liberty Lost 
Hotel.

Travis J. I. Corcoran, the owner of a video-rental company in Arlington,

Mass., learned of the project and decided to start a pledge to 
demonstrate the potential economic gain to Weare. He asked 10 people to 
commit to paying for a seven-night stay at the proposed hotel; 1,418 
people made the commitment before the pledge closed at the end of
August.

"I might be a meat-eating hunter, and someone else might be a vegetarian

activist," Mr. Corcoran said, "but online we can come together for this 
one issue."


   * Copyright 2005
     <http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html> 
     <http://www.nytco.com/>


_______________________________________________
Geowanking mailing list
Geowanking at lists.burri.to
http://lists.burri.to/mailman/listinfo/geowanking

----- End forwarded message -----
-- 
Eugen* Leitl <a href="http://leitl.org">leitl</a>
______________________________________________________________
ICBM: 48.07100, 11.36820            http://www.leitl.org
8B29F6BE: 099D 78BA 2FD3 B014 B08A  7779 75B0 2443 8B29 F6BE

------------------------------

Message: 36
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 07:53:04 -0500
From: "Corinna" <schultz at harlingen.isd.tenet.edu>
Subject: [FoRK] bioinformatics
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <di0ibh$vih$1 at sea.gmane.org>

Just curious, is anyone here involved with, or has an opinion on, 
bioinformatics?  I heard a talk yesterday from a UTPA prof who's working
in 
that field and it sounded interesting. I was wondering what the private 
sector job opportunities (and pay) are like...

-Corinna 





------------------------------

Message: 37
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 07:51:11 -0500
From: "Corinna" <schultz at harlingen.isd.tenet.edu>
Subject: [FoRK] Re: DBs and online forms
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <di0i81$v83$1 at sea.gmane.org>


"Culture Lab" <info at pulpculture.org> wrote in message >
> So, the next step is to see if anyone's created such an app,
translating 
> either raw data right into a predefined form or created a database
backend 
> to do live processing of the input

We do this, but not very efficiently, in Delphi. Our program is called
Vesta 
(vestanotes.com), and it handles the data needed by home health care 
agencies. Our forms are a really big hit with our clients, for the
reasons 
you suggested.  However, what we do is we actually draw the forms (with 
lines, labels, etc), and put input fields on the form -- automatically 
filling out fields with the patient's name, and so forth -- so it's very

WYSIWYG for the user. They can then print preview, and then print. Some
of 
our forms use data input dialogs, but the newer forms are visual. The
input 
data is saved into a database, so a patient can have multiple versions
of 
forms, old forms can be pulled up, a patient's chart can be printed out,
and 
so forth.  I've heard that in Delphi, it's possible to use an image as a

background to a window, and then place the input fields on top of the
image, 
but then you have to worry about resolution differences and so forth.

I would agree with you that this kind of data application has a large 
potential market in all sorts of industries, but one problem we have is 
varying state laws. Because each state has its own version of Medicaid,
our 
software really will only work in Texas, unless we do state-by-state 
customizing (which we do to some extent for Oklahoma and Florida) 





------------------------------

Message: 38
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 21:16:45 +0800
From: James Tauber <jtauber at jtauber.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Technology/Innovation in AU
To: Mark Nottingham <mnot at mnot.net>
Cc: forkit!Now <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <8574AD5F-87D9-45E0-A242-6EB107D236E1 at jtauber.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed


Sorry, I didn't mean to suggest I was the one being cut down. I  
haven't reached that level of success :-)

James


On 05/10/2005, at 10:38 AM, Mark Nottingham wrote:

> You tall poppy, you ;)
>
>
> On 04/10/2005, at 6:47 PM, James Tauber wrote:
>
>
>>
>> I'm fortunate enough to live in Australia but work in the US. Best of
>> both worlds.
>>
>> I love living in Australia but got frustrated working there
>> (for some of the reasons you mention and some that you don't such  
>> as the
>> complete suspicion of anyone successful in business and too much  
>> of an
>> us-them attitude between workers and management)
>>
>> James
>>
>> On Tue, 4 Oct 2005 13:06:12 -0700, "Mark Nottingham" <mnot at mnot.net>
>> said:
>>
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>> Im moving back to Australia in 2 weeks. Your'e all welcome to join
>>>>> me.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>
>>> I'd be interested in hearing of stories from those who have done  
>>> this
>>> (i.e., specifically, Australia). I hold AU residence, and one of the
>>> things that's keeping me from moving back is the relative dearth of
>>> work options for technical people who still want to actually  
>>> think on
>>> the job.
>>>
>>> It seems to me that there are plenty of talented people in AU  
>>> (that I
>>> know personally or by reputation), but for whatever reason,
>>> innovation doesn't really take hold; there aren't many big companies
>>> that hire people for research / exploration (Telstra and CSIRO come
>>> to mind), and getting a startup going is very difficult, due to a
>>> lack of angel / seed funding.
>>>
>>> Not that they don't know this; the subject has been explored to
>>> death, as far as I can see (e.g., "Backing Australia's Ability").
>>>
>>> There was a nice article about this in (I think) the Journal a few
>>> years back, to the effect that Australia is doing so well because of
>>> IT; not because it innovates, but because it *implements* so very
>>> well, based on what others innovate.
>>>
>>> P.S. There's a "Startup Funding Alternatives" panel by ANZA (sort of
>>> an AU/US business association) in Palo Alto tomorrow night:
>>>    http://www.anzatechnet.com/conference2005/reg_all/panel_reg1.jsp
>>> I was thinking of checking it out; anybody have any experience with
>>> this org?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> FoRK mailing list
>>> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
>>>
>>>
>> -- 
>>   James Tauber               http://jtauber.com/
>>   journeyman of some    http://jtauber.com/blog/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Mark Nottingham     http://www.mnot.net/
>
>



------------------------------

Message: 39
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 09:18:36 -0400
From: Gavin Thomas Nicol <gtn at rbii.com>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] DBs and online forms
To: "Com Fork at Xent." <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <2FF7B18B-B0A9-4295-A076-4AD225262A57 at rbii.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed


On Oct 4, 2005, at 10:17 PM, Culture Lab wrote:
> So, the next step is to see if anyone's created such an app,  
> translating either raw data right into a predefined form or created  
> a database backend to do live processing of the input to the  
> Acrobat PDF file on line. Am I making any sense? (This isn't my  
> field, which is why I'm asking around here.)

If you can get the actual BigCo form in PDF that has field  
definitions, you can use various toolkits (in Java and other  
languages) to enter the data directly into the PDF. Of course, if you  
want to reuse the data, you might be better putting it into a db or  
an XML file, and converting that into PDF (use db->xml->FOP (thanks  
James :-)).



------------------------------

Message: 40
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 07:51:08 -0700 (PDT)
From: rudy rouhana <rudy at comlaw.org>
Subject: [FoRK] Engineer/Architect wanted to design and spec a
	national	wireless network
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <20051005145108.77479.qmail at web60816.mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

One of our clients is attempting to roll out a
wireless/cellular network in a developing nation
(can't disclose which).  There is some regulatory work
that would be great if the Eng/Arch had an
understanding of, but I think that those sort of
comparitive law questions might be something we, or
the client, will tackle.

The primary, necessary component now is the Eng/Arch
that has experience designing and rolling out a large
scale cellular network.  I know they don't grow on
trees, but I figure I'd throw this to the group
because people know people, so maybe I could
6-degrees-of-Kevin-Bacon a solution together.

-r


------------------------------

Message: 41
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 10:02:38 -0700
From: Jim Whitehead <ejw at soe.ucsc.edu>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Palm or iPOD?
To: Marty Halvorson <marty at halvorson.us>
Cc: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <569B9144-7534-4E7E-85C2-A548615697C1 at cs.ucsc.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

I'll do the contrarian view.

She doesn't need a PDA, she just needs a paper calendar.

If she gets a PDA, it'll get munched, lost, or stolen. If none of  
those things happen, the battery will run out, and she'll lose all  
her data.

- Jim


On Oct 4, 2005, at 7:41 PM, Marty Halvorson wrote:

> My daughter has just informed me she really, really needs a PDA.   
> The question is which one?  I don't have a clue.  I've never felt  
> the need for one, and now that I'm retired, I definitely don't need  
> one.
>
> So, since many FoRKers seem to be into having the latest and  
> greatest technology, I figured you all could give me some advice on  
> whether the iPOD or the Palm is preferable.  Just remember I'm  
> retired now and cost will be an issue.
>
> Peace,
>
> Marty Halvorson
> marty at halvorson.us
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork
>



------------------------------

Message: 42
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 12:07:38 -0600
From: mattj at newsblip.com
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Vancouver's Still On Top... (The Economist)
To: fork at xent.com
Message-ID: <20051005120738.xct4rlcoir2vkc0k at 216.194.106.19>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=ISO-8859-1;	format="flowed"

Quoting "Ian Andrew Bell (FoRK)" <fork at ianbell.com>:

> Vancouver, Montreal, and Toronto were all in the Top 5.

Canada's great, and those are all cities I'd consider moving to
(hypothetically).

> If you do, bring  companies with you.

(The article also says "Cleveland and Pittsburgh had the highest
American
scores."  I'm not interested in moving to either of them.  If you want 
business
to move to your city, you need to be "interesting" as well as 
"livable". Vancouver, Montreal, and Toronto seem to be both.)

Also, "Sixty-three cities - almost half of those surveyed in total - 
fall  into
the top liveability bracket."  Whuh?  How many brackets are there?

-Matt Jensen
http://mattjensen.com
Seattle





------------------------------

Message: 43
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2005 20:18:43 +0200
From: Eugen Leitl <eugen at leitl.org>
Subject: [FoRK] NANO: Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines Now Freely
	Available Online
To: forkit! <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <20051005181843.GQ2249 at leitl.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


************************************************************************
****
*
Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines Now Freely Available Online

The most comprehensive review of the field of Kinematic Self-Replicating
Machines (KSRM), the title of a book co-authored by Robert A. Freitas
Jr.
(http://www.rfreitas.com) and Ralph C. Merkle (http://www.merkle.com),
was
published in hardback in late 2004.  The book is still available in
print
(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1570596905), but KSRM is now
freely
accessible online at http://www.MolecularAssembler.com/KSRM.htm.  With
200+
illustrations and 3200+ literature references, KSRM describes all
proposed
and experimentally realized self-replicating systems that were publicly
known as of 2004, ranging from nanoscale to macroscale systems.  The
book
extensively describes the historical development of the field.  It
presents
for the first time a detailed 137-dimensional map of the entire
kinematic
replicator design space to assist future engineering efforts.  KSRM has
been
cited in two articles appearing in Nature this year (Zykov et al, Nature
435, 163 (12 May 2005) and Griffith et al, Nature 437, 636 (29 September
2005)) and appears well on its way to becoming the classic reference in
this
field.
************************************************************************
****
*

----- End forwarded message -----
-- 
Eugen* Leitl <a href="http://leitl.org">leitl</a>
______________________________________________________________
ICBM: 48.07100, 11.36820            http://www.leitl.org
8B29F6BE: 099D 78BA 2FD3 B014 B08A  7779 75B0 2443 8B29 F6BE

------------------------------

Message: 44
Date: Thu, 6 Oct 2005 00:58:08 +0530
From: "Naren" <nsavara at vsnl.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Three most import attributes for a Bush
	appointment
To: "Adam L Beberg" <beberg at mithral.com>,	"FoRK" <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <00a801c5c9e2$ed2d7ba0$140310ac at darksun4>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

lol! that's a good one Adam...
/
/oil prices are already causing economic problems. Asia is where all the

/economic action is, and they can think more then 1 quarterly statement 
/ahead, but the languages and being a 6'1" near albino means jobs there 
/are probably out of the question. Lots of relatives in Canada, the 
/
look at the brighter side... your american accent will make you REALLY
fit into the call center biz... :-))

and your inability to fit in with the local population will ensure you
work harder than everyone else; and hence rise to the top :-))) since
you'll stay hidden from the unadmiring public to drudge day in and night
out for your call center job!!!

maybe you could find some VC fund that's investing the retirement
savings of overtaxed hardworking californians and even become some sort
of a call center entrepreneur!!! :-)

<<or maybe as a voice accent trainer AFTER YOU'VE FAILED AT THAT!!! >>

And yeah... until u manage to fit in, maybe you could fertilize eggs for
a living.... what with all the pollution, pesticides and declining
fertility rates in China... and good genetics being at a premium
there.....

just kidding....

but frankly... at 6'1" you'd be among the shorter or average height of
the younger generation of Chinese... since when I visited Shanghai this
march/april; I saw that most of the 10-12 year olds are 5'8" or taller;
and amazingly many of the 15/16 year olds are 6'+ or even 6'1"+...

but cynical humour apart..... 
why're you assuming the near albino colour of your skin or your
inability to speak anything other than english or your height (as if
that height is unusual with the locals) will make a difference ? 

NS...

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Adam L Beberg" <beberg at mithral.com>
To: "Strata R. Chalup" <strata at virtual.net>
Cc: "forkit!Now" <fork at xent.com>
Sent: Wednesday, October 05, 2005 4:23 PM
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Three most import attributes for a Bush appointment


> Strata R. Chalup wrote on 10/4/2005 12:59 AM:
> > 
> > Are you planning to be dead then, or living in another country, or
what?
> 
> No, probably, uploaded?
> 
> By the time I finish my PhD, there will be no computer science
students 
> left in the US for me to teach. Everyone knows all the tech jobs are 
> headed for places you earn $200/month. Between DARPA, NIH, and NSF 
> cutbacks, there will also be no money for non-military research.
> 
> So I will probably not be looking for jobs here.
> 
> Europe is nice, but likely to reglaciate when the gulf stream stops
and 
> oil prices are already causing economic problems. Asia is where all
the 
> economic action is, and they can think more then 1 quarterly statement

> ahead, but the languages and being a 6'1" near albino means jobs there

> are probably out of the question. Lots of relatives in Canada, the 
> people are nice too. Who knows.
> 
> But I think it's safe to assume you'll see an Atlas Shrugged scale
evac 
> of anyone with resources out of the US when the shit hits the fan and 
> the 20 dollar bill becomes toilet paper.
> 
> 
> -- 
> Adam L. Beberg
> http://www.mithral.com/~beberg/
> 
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork

------------------------------

Message: 45
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 2005 11:43:00 -0700
From: "Tracie K Meyer" <con10gent_sentience at inoutbox.com>
Subject: [FoRK] FEMA--dire opinion from the strangest magazine=govtech
To: "DiningUtensil" <fork at xent.com>
Message-ID: <1128537780.30119.244490402 at webmail.messagingengine.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

 "The Department is in contempt of Congress. If I were called by
 Congress to testify on why public warnings did not go forward, it would
 only take one word: FEMA" -- NASCIO Consultant Peter Ward
=======
FEMA Not On Alert
By Paul W. Taylor 

The state of emergency caused by back-to-back hurricanes in the Gulf
Coast states was compounded by communications failures -- including the
conspicuous absence of a modern alerting system to provide warnings
about the coming threats to cell phones, pagers, and Blackberry devices
or other personal digital assistants.

The beleaguered Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), blamed for
the inadequate initial response to Katrina, has also delayed funding to
a state-based pilot project to begin modernizing public alerts using
widely adopted technologies.

The intelligence reform bill passed by Congress and signed by President
Bush on December 17, 2004, included a provision for a "pilot study to
move warning systems into the modern digital age" that directed the
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) -- into which the formerly
independent FEMA now reports -- to work with other federal agencies and
the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) to
model an emergency alerts system after the Internet-based AMBER Alert
portal. The Act required a report on the pilot results within nine
months. As that deadline passed in September, there was no report and
there was no pilot.

"The Department is in contempt of Congress," claims Peter Ward, a
veteran of a decades-long effort to improve public alerting and now an
independent consultant to NASCIO on the all-hazard alert pilot, "If I
were called by Congress to testify on why public warnings did not go
forward, it would only take one word -- FEMA."

Mindful of the Congressional timelines, NASCIO's alerting proposal had
requested $1.3 million from FEMA for a "multi-state pilot and a
production-ready system in as short as six months." NASCIO and the AMBER
Alert portal initially expected a deal with FEMA by mid-January. Through
on-again, off-again negotiations in the months since, FEMA lowered the
funding level to $520,000, which reduced the scope of the pilot to a
single state.

The final figure is a fraction of the $20 million appropriated to DHS by
Congress since 2004 for the development of a new system to provide
public warnings through conventional broadcasters and a full range of
modern communications devices. Even before the flurry of post-Katrina
bills, there were plans to add another $5 million for FY 2006. With the
federal government expected to spend up to $200 billion on
hurricane-related recovery, draft bills supported by the cell phone
industry now anticipate apportioning millions of additional dollars to
DHS for research and development of a modern public warning system. 

Much of that work has already been done. In 2000, nineteen federal
agencies with responsibility for public alerting jointly released what
became known as the Red Book, which was a framework report for effective
disaster warnings that called for an increased role for public-private
partnerships. Since then, the alerting community -- comprised of some
130 emergency management experts -- developed and tested the Common
Alerting Protocol (CAP), an open technical OASIS XML standard for public
warnings.

NASCIO's proposal is CAP-compliant, relies on a public-private
partnership and is based on an end-to-end portal structure that is
already working in the real world. "We were surprised at how long it has
taken to fulfill a congressional mandate," says Chris Dixon, NASCIO's
national issues director, "but we're determined to get to the national
roll-out phase."

>From the beginning though, the state-based approach appears to have
been
at odds with a direction favored by Reynold Hoover who, until a recent
move to the White House, had served as the director of FEMA's Office of
National Security Coordination. Even before the intelligence reform bill
was signed, Hoover suggested in an e-mail to members of the alerting
community that the NASCIO initiative be combined with a separate
congressionally-mandated project and -- ultimately -- rolled into a
larger initiative being developed in his office to avoid "an additional
time consuming pilot." 

The larger initiative became known as the Integrated Public Alert and
Warning System (IPAWS) and has been used to expand the office's narrow
responsibilities for initiating national-level emergency alerts to a
funding gatekeeper for all things related to public alerting. Funds have
been used to upgrade some existing systems, conduct preliminary
research, development and testing with a large systems integrator and
place NOAA All Hazards weather radios in a select number of public
schools across the country. Still, IPAWS remains largely conceptual,
doing little to address the "hodgepodge" of inadequate, aging and arcane
systems cited by a new report by the Congressional Research Service, the
research arm of Congress.

As recently as July 27, 2005, in testimony before a US Senate
subcommittee on Disaster Prevention and Prediction, Hoover told
lawmakers that his office was still finalizing an agreement with NASCIO
to add "another powerful dimension" to a "national all hazards IPAWS."
At last word, the pilot funding remained in the DHS acquisition process
-- even as Congress began looking to claw back appropriations to help
fund hurricane recovery efforts.

"Alerting is primarily a state and local responsibility so it made sense
for state CIOs to take an active role in this," observes Dixon, "NASCIO
got involved because alerting provided a great platform for
demonstrating how the Internet can transform old ways of doing things."
As importantly, there is a growing sense that nimble and robust alerting
network is the nation's next critical infrastructure. To that end, says
Dixon, "state CIOs wanted to get out in front now so that, years from
now, they would not have to find a way to unify disparate alerting
systems after the fact."

The renewed Congressional interest in warning systems could cut both
ways for the state-based approach to a national alerting program. It
could shake loose the long-awaited funds to meet the original mandate
and provide addition funds for the national build out of this and other
allied alerting initiatives. It could also have the unintended
consequence of swamping the NASCIO-sponsored state solution with a
centrally-controlled federal system that could do for alerting what the
creation of the Department of Homeland Security did for FEMA. 

"Government is getting in its own way," says Chris Warner, president of
E2C, the company that was the catalyst for the AMBER Alert portal on
which the all-hazard pilot would be modeled, "The stakes are just too
high not to try to fix this." 

Ward sees a sad irony in the gulf coast tragedies, "What has been
missing was a catalyst for a national public alerting system. Now you
finally have a catalyst and you wish you didn't."

FEMA did not respond to requests for comment on this story.
http://www.govtech.net/magazine/channel_story.php/96747
*disclaimer:distributed for educational purposes only blah blah blah
etcera et al*






-tkm
--
If I could only live at the pitch that is near madness
When everything is as it was in my childhood
Violent,vivid,and of infinite possibility:
That the sun and moon broke over my head.-preface,
'Feast of Snakes'
 

-- 
http://www.fastmail.fm - Access all of your messages and folders
                          wherever you are



------------------------------

Message: 46
Date: Thu, 6 Oct 2005 01:12:01 +0530
From: "Naren" <nsavara at vsnl.net>
Subject: Re: [FoRK] Re: DBs and online forms
To: "FoRK" <fork at xent.com>,	<schultz at harlingen.isd.tenet.edu>
Message-ID: <00c901c5c9e4$ddaa7730$140310ac at darksun4>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

Hey... this is interesting... and it could perhaps be the start of a
bigger, mass-market product...

look forward to everyone's comment on this... a serious post here from
me...

"Corinna" <schultz at harlingen.isd.tenet.edu> wrote in message
news:di0i81$v83$1 at sea.gmane.org...
> 
> "Culture Lab" <info at pulpculture.org> wrote in message >
> > So, the next step is to see if anyone's created such an app,
translating 
> > either raw data right into a predefined form or created a database
backend 
> > to do live processing of the input
> 
> I would agree with you that this kind of data application has a large 
> potential market in all sorts of industries, but one problem we have
is 
> varying state laws. Because each state has its own version of
Medicaid, our 
> software really will only work in Texas, unless we do state-by-state 
> customizing (which we do to some extent for Oklahoma and Florida) 
> 
I'd say you have the recipe for something that can be productised into a
well-selling product (if not a best-selling product a few versions
later)... and I say this in general coz all a best selling product
entails is:--

(1) More than just "this kind of data application"; anyplace where you
implement a project that leverages domain knowledge (like your company's
application does); 

(2) and anytime where you can have a company being "market driven"---
ie: driven by what the market/clients want---> like your company is,
right now.

Provided you can sort of generalize it while keeping your company client
driven....

If for example, you could separate the region/state-specific
business-rules from the business logic--- maybe by having the rules
implemented by perl/python/javascript/vbscript scripts that run using
your application as the container; and then...
EITHER:
give either customers in general or premium customers who get special
licenses the option of moving faster than you by customizing the rules
to their own taste/needs
OR 
divide your development into the core application team; and the
client-specific implementation/customization team with the option of
allowing marketting/sales partners to have their own implementation
teams
----> then you (ie: your company) could really scale up and maybe have
the next superhit product on your hands...

Just a opinion that's informed by experience...
What say others ?

What say Corrina ?

Wondering, Wondering...

Naren

ps: dont worry about the messiness... as long as things stay under the
hood, know for sure that your messiness can never even think of beating
either Adobe or Microsoft when it comes to messiness....

"Corinna" <schultz at harlingen.isd.tenet.edu> wrote in message
news:di0i81$v83$1 at sea.gmane.org...
> 
> "Culture Lab" <info at pulpculture.org> wrote in message >
> > So, the next step is to see if anyone's created such an app,
translating 
> > either raw data right into a predefined form or created a database
backend 
> > to do live processing of the input
> 
> I would agree with you that this kind of data application has a large 
> potential market in all sorts of industries, but one problem we have
is 
> varying state laws. Because each state has its own version of
Medicaid, our 
> software really will only work in Texas, unless we do state-by-state 
> customizing (which we do to some extent for Oklahoma and Florida) 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> FoRK mailing list
> http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork


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