Massive quantities of ice crystals on Mars

Elias Sinderson elias@cse.ucsc.edu
Wed, 29 May 2002 14:27:38 -0700


Several people participating in this thread are apparently unaware of 
the following relevant documents (or have not taken the time to read 
them), listed from the most recent:

The Space Millennium: Vienna Declaration on Space and Human Development
http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/unisp-3/res/html/viennadecl.html

Agreement Governing the Activities of States on the Moon and Other 
Celestial Bodies - aka 'The Moon Treaty'
http://www.iasl.mcgill.ca/space/moon.html
In particular, note articles 4, 7, 11, and 14.

Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the 
Exploration and Use of Outer Space,including the Moon and Other 
Celestial Bodies - aka 'The Outer Space Treaty'
http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/treat/ost/ost.html

Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in 
the Exploration and Use of Outer Space
http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/SpaceLaw/lpostxt.htm

In short, outer space and the celestial bodies cannot be appropriated by 
any one state. The resources that exist there cannot be used for other 
than the common good of mankind. If you're still interested, check out 
the following:

United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UN-OOSA):
http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/OOSA/oosa.html

United Nations Treaties and Principles on Space Law
http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/SpaceLaw/treaties.html

"The international legal principles in these five treaties provide for 
non-appropriation of outer space by any one country, arms control, the 
freedom of exploration, liability for damage caused by space objects, 
the safety and rescue of spacecraft and astronauts, the prevention of 
harmful interference with space activities and the environment, the 
notification and registration of space activities, scientific 
investigation and the exploitation of natural resources in outer space 
and the settlement of disputes. Each of the treaties lays great stress 
on the notion that the domain of outer space, the activities carried out 
therein and whatever benefits might accrue therefrom should be devoted 
to enhancing the well-being of all countries and humankind, and each 
includes elements elaborating the common idea of promoting international 
cooperation in outer space activities."

And please, let's not get into the issue of who's going to enforce these 
  treatys if we decide to mine the moon or set up a military base there 
- it's just not productive or reasonable.


Elias