AOL in Negotiations to Acquire Red Hat

Luis Villa louie@ximian.com
21 Jan 2002 18:03:59 -0500


On Mon, 2002-01-21 at 17:15, Gary Lawrence Murphy wrote:
> >>>>> "L" == Luis Villa <louie@ximian.com> writes:
> 
>     L> On Mon, 2002-01-21 at 11:11, Gary Lawrence Murphy wrote:
>     L> I don't think that's accurate at all. Linus is constantly
>     L> talking on putting Linux on every possible piece of HW he can
>     L> get his hands on
> 
> true, yes, but that's a very different question from making it a
> mainstream OS for non-technical people.

Fair enough; but it's still a valid example- Linus wants to put things
on as many platforms as possible, and the leaders in the desktop (GNOME,
KDE) have all made similar noises. In other words, the people who are
leading by doing are leading in the direction of increased usability and
popularity.
 
>     L> 'World domination' can't be done without becoming popular,
> 
> In Linus' own words, Linux has nothing whatsoever to do with world
> domination. It is only said to be something "fun for him to work on"
> and that distinction is very, very important when you want to
> understand why Linux is the way it is.

'World Domination. Fast.' /are/ Linus's own words, when asked about the
goals of Linux. Obviously, a joke, but also with a nugget of truth.
Yeah, he says a lot about it being fun to work on- but as ESR will tell
you over and over again, part of why hackers find this kind of stuff fun
to work on is the knowledge that many, many people are using it.

> If anyone can find any reference to Linus saying differently, please
> post it -- I searched quite earnestly when I was lobbying for kernel
> documentation and could find no such reference.  The closest I ever
> found was a comment by his mother (about how Linux might aid
> developing nations).  I have found no such quote by Linus Torvalds.

Unfortunately, google doesn't seem to have the original 'world
domination' newsgroup post archived, but as early as 1997 Linus was
giving speeches titled 'World Domination 101' at places like Stanford,
so he wasn't exactly disputing the imagery.

Luis