Software the way of the textile industry?

Pang, Hokkun HPang@Yesmail.com
Wed, 16 Jan 2002 07:58:06 -0600


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I think much of the 'sofware' industry is in product/market innovation,
support 
and maintenance. As long as the US is still the economy driver, these
components 
will stay in the US. Sure, implementation can go away just like textile
manufacturing. 
But fashion design and dry clean got to stay local unless everyone is into
disposable
chinese/indian ethnic clothings. And don't forget that the cashier at Gap
makes more 
money at selling a pair of jeans than the sweatshop girl sewing it in China.


Now, if the US ceases to be the economy driver, if the US consumers ain't
the only 
ones the software industry try to serve, then the US software industry may
be 
competing like the scandanavian furnitures and microsoft will like like
another ikea.

The other day, I was listening to a radio show on the US auto industry. When
asked to
compare the Japanese and US auto industry, this VP of GM said that "US is
more innovative"
and implied that Japan was better at making older products. He cited the
introduction of
mini-van and pickup trucks as examples of innovation. Well, he certainly had
a point, 
but who else in the world would ever need a oversized personal transporter
guzzling gas 
at a gallon per 10 miles?

-----Original Message-----
From: Adam L. Beberg [mailto:beberg@mithral.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 11:55 PM
To: Owen Byrne
Cc: Jeff Bone; fork@xent.com
Subject: Re: Software the way of the textile industry?


On Tue, 15 Jan 2002, Owen Byrne wrote:

> On Tue, Jan 15, 2002 at 07:56:28PM -0600, Jeff Bone wrote:
> >
> >
> > Owen Byrne wrote:
> >
> > > So I would say that the phenomenon is happening, just not overnight.
> >
> > No question.  The question, really, is why it's not happening even
faster.
>
> Because decision makers are willing to pay a premium for "face time", in
> order to enhance their feelings of self-control and inflate their own
> importance?

Probably because managing remote people is something noone teaches you how
to do and doing it well involves alot more work, not to mention the cultural
issues, then managing local people. But noone really 'gets' that becasue so
few even try... And most geeks can't even work well with the person in the
next cube.

> At least that was the conclusion I came to concerning why telecommuting
> didn't catch on, which seems similar.

No, that failed because 95% of people didn't do any work from home. Which if
you think about it is only _half_ as productive as having 90% who dont do
anything AT work. This was a boom thing just like bringing your dog to work
and the foozball table. Next they will figure out people spend all their
time online at work if they can get online from work...

- Adam L. "Duncan" Beberg
  http://www.mithral.com/~beberg/
  beberg@mithral.com



http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork

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RE: Software the way of the textile industry?



I think much of the 'sofware' industry is in product/market innovation, support
and maintenance. As long as the US is still the economy driver, these components
will stay in the US. Sure, implementation can go away just like textile manufacturing.
But fashion design and dry clean got to stay local unless everyone is into disposable
chinese/indian ethnic clothings. And don't forget that the cashier at Gap makes more
money at selling a pair of jeans than the sweatshop girl sewing it in China.

Now, if the US ceases to be the economy driver, if the US consumers ain't the only
ones the software industry try to serve, then the US software industry may be
competing like the scandanavian furnitures and microsoft will like like another ikea.

The other day, I was listening to a radio show on the US auto industry. When asked to
compare the Japanese and US auto industry, this VP of GM said that "US is more innovative"
and implied that Japan was better at making older products. He cited the introduction of
mini-van and pickup trucks as examples of innovation. Well, he certainly had a point,
but who else in the world would ever need a oversized personal transporter guzzling gas
at a gallon per 10 miles?

-----Original Message-----
From: Adam L. Beberg [mailto:beberg@mithral.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 11:55 PM
To: Owen Byrne
Cc: Jeff Bone; fork@xent.com
Subject: Re: Software the way of the textile industry?


On Tue, 15 Jan 2002, Owen Byrne wrote:

> On Tue, Jan 15, 2002 at 07:56:28PM -0600, Jeff Bone wrote:
> >
> >
> > Owen Byrne wrote:
> >
> > > So I would say that the phenomenon is happening, just not overnight.
> >
> > No question.  The question, really, is why it's not happening even faster.
>
> Because decision makers are willing to pay a premium for "face time", in
> order to enhance their feelings of self-control and inflate their own
> importance?

Probably because managing remote people is something noone teaches you how
to do and doing it well involves alot more work, not to mention the cultural
issues, then managing local people. But noone really 'gets' that becasue so
few even try... And most geeks can't even work well with the person in the
next cube.

> At least that was the conclusion I came to concerning why telecommuting
> didn't catch on, which seems similar.

No, that failed because 95% of people didn't do any work from home. Which if
you think about it is only _half_ as productive as having 90% who dont do
anything AT work. This was a boom thing just like bringing your dog to work
and the foozball table. Next they will figure out people spend all their
time online at work if they can get online from work...

- Adam L. "Duncan" Beberg
  http://www.mithral.com/~beberg/
  beberg@mithral.com



http://xent.com/mailman/listinfo/fork

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