In Support of Intermittent Connectivity

Jeff Bone jbone@jump.net
Tue, 22 May 2001 11:08:03 -0500


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Per our previous discussion about whether and to what extent constant
connectivity is, in the general case, the norm or rather an
exceptional condition....  btw, yes Gene, I'm posting this as HTML
just to piss you off. ;-)

     Go thoughtfully in the knowledge that all interplanetary
     communication derives from the modulation of radiated
     energy, and sometimes a planet will be between the source
     and the destination.  Therefore rely not on end-to-end
     connectivity at any time, for the universe does not work
     that way.

     Neither rely on ample bandwidth, for power is scarce out
     there and the bit error rates are high.  Know too that
     signal strength drops off by the square of the distance, and
     there is a lot of distance.

     Consider the preciousness of interplanetary communication
     links, and restrict access to them with all your heart.
     Protect also the confidentiality of application data or risk
     losing your customers.

     Remember always that launch mass costs money.  Think not,
     then, that you may require all the universe to adopt at once
     the newest technologies.  Be backward compatible.

     Never confuse patience with inaction.  By waiting for
     acknowledgement to one message before sending the next, you
     squander tracking pass time that will never come to you
     again in this life.  Send as much as you can, as early as
     you can, and meanwhile confidently await responses for as
     long as they may take to find their way to you.

     Therefore be at peace with physics, and expect not to manage
     the network in closed control loops -- neither in the
     limiting of congestion nor in the negotiation of connection
     parameters nor even in on-demand access to transmission
     bands.  Each node must make its own operating choices in its
     own understanding, for all the others are too far away to
     ask.  Truly the solar system is a large place and each one
     of us is on his or her own.  Deal with it.


             - S. Burleigh, "Desiderata of Interplanetary
Internetworking,"
                from Interplanetary Internet (IPN):  Architectural
Definition


jb



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Per our previous discussion about whether and to what extent constant connectivity is, in the general case, the norm or rather an exceptional condition....  btw, yes Gene, I'm posting this as HTML just to piss you off. ;-)
Go thoughtfully in the knowledge that all interplanetary communication derives from the modulation of radiated energy, and sometimes a planet will be between the source and the destination.  Therefore rely not on end-to-end connectivity at any time, for the universe does not work that way.
 
Neither rely on ample bandwidth, for power is scarce out there and the bit error rates are high.  Know too that signal strength drops off by the square of the distance, and there is a lot of distance.
 
Consider the preciousness of interplanetary communication links, and restrict access to them with all your heart.  Protect also the confidentiality of application data or risk losing your customers.
 
Remember always that launch mass costs money.  Think not, then, that you may require all the universe to adopt at once the newest technologies.  Be backward compatible.
 
Never confuse patience with inaction.  By waiting for acknowledgement to one message before sending the next, you squander tracking pass time that will never come to you again in this life.  Send as much as you can, as early as you can, and meanwhile confidently await responses for as long as they may take to find their way to you.
 
Therefore be at peace with physics, and expect not to manage the network in closed control loops -- neither in the limiting of congestion nor in the negotiation of connection parameters nor even in on-demand access to transmission bands.  Each node must make its own operating choices in its own understanding, for all the others are too far away to ask.  Truly the solar system is a large place and each one of us is on his or her own.  Deal with it.
 
             - S. Burleigh, "Desiderata of Interplanetary Internetworking,"
                from Interplanetary Internet (IPN):  Architectural Definition
 

jb

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